Prime Minister Infinity – U.K. – Version Amundsen – 1.8.6

Prime Minister Infinity – U.K. v. Amundsen – 1.8.6 for Windows and Mac has been released!

If you are a Prime Minister Infinity – U.K. pre-orderer and ordered before Jan. 30th, you are eligible for this release.

You can download this release by requesting a download e-mail at the link below.

Notes:

This release is a sneak peek. The game is being released early to start getting feedback.

The game will be filled in over the next two weeks (approximately).

Right now, I’m particularly interested in feedback on

  • leader attributes
  • campaign attributes
  • which parties (are we missing any that you think will be important?)
  • starting funds
  • percentages

Issues, incumbents, endorsers, and interviewers are not done, and feedback is welcome on these. You will see remnants of the American game in some places, including graphics – these will be changed. The main map interface is slow (and some other parts) – this will be sped up (we are now dealing with 650 constituencies x more than 10 parties, much more than any other game using the Infinity engine).

Feedback welcome!

Important: when you receive the e-mail, you will want to download the file from the “win pmi united kingdom” or “mac pmi united kingdom” link.

If for some reason there is no “win pmi united kingdom” or “mac pmi united kingdom” link in your e-mail and you are a Prime Minister Infinity- U.K. pre-orderer who ordered before Jan. 30th, please notify us and we will fix that for you.

To download:

http://270soft.com/updates-redownloads/

 

34 Responses to Prime Minister Infinity – U.K. – Version Amundsen – 1.8.6

  1. Rophil January 31, 2015 at 4:50 am #

    It is a very good job, but the game is particulary slow. I have to wait a long time when I select a region, or a section in the campaign editor. However, I think the dates of the debates are wrong, because in the game it is all set in 2016. Percentages are very detailed, it is very good, and leaders are perfect to me. For the issues, I think you should add two issues particulary important: Islam and European Union. It is today very discussed issues, particulary for the Right. I remember David Cameron promised to organize a referendum about EU if he is reelected, and recent Islamic terrorist attak in Paris shoked all the county. As last comment, I have a suggestion for relations, because I think it should be “bad” between UKIP and Conservative, I remember David Cameron publicly said UKIP was “a party of alcoholics and racists”, so I don’t think relations should be at “normal”.

  2. Jack January 31, 2015 at 5:39 am #

    Nice test release! The leaders seem fine to me, and starting funds are relatively OK. I don’t think it needs any more parties at the moment, although Respect could theoretically be added due to their representation in parliament. One thing I did notice is that the majority of the constituency percentages need changing, although the idea of UKIP gaining Orkney and Shetland from the Lib Dems is rather amusing! The latest polls suggest Tories and Labour both on 280 seats, Lib Dems on 24, UKIP on 5, Greens on 1 and the SNP on 38… If you do need a hand with any aspect of the constituencies, I’m more than ready to help!

    As for election issues, I’d suggest the following will be the most important (roughly in order):

    NHS
    Immigration
    European Union
    Economic Management
    Tax Policy
    Budget and Deficit
    Care for the Elderly
    Education
    Terrorism
    Security and Privacy
    Welfare/Benefits

    All in all, it’s a promising start to what will be a fantastic game!

  3. jl_9252 January 31, 2015 at 6:17 am #

    issues will be some bread and butter issues
    pension
    tax policy
    NHS
    European Union
    immigration
    housing
    Employment
    Proportional representation
    devolution
    English laws
    transportation
    education
    family
    environment
    welfare
    deficit cut
    spending on govt

  4. Will January 31, 2015 at 6:19 am #

    The main problem I can see is the polling. The SNP should be outpolling Labour in Scotland and some of the constituencies are quite a way off what is realistic, such as the Greens on 40% in Norwich South.

  5. Michael January 31, 2015 at 7:14 am #

    A very good game, and nice to have more features compared to the 2010 version.

    Here are my immediate comments after just a couple of hours playing:

    1. It takes a long time to move to the next turn. But I guess you know that already.
    2. Nick Clegg’s integrity is certainly not 5. In the eyes of the public it is max 3, if not 2 after his u-turn on university fees.
    3. UKIP already hold Clacton and Rochester & Strood following by-elections. Nobody is even considering the idea that they will not retain Clacton this year, so that should be reflected in the figures.
    4. The Greens are nowhere near 40% in Norwich South, and not particularly close to gaining Cambridge either. There best bets for wins aside from Brighton Pavillion are Norwich South and Bristol West, but they’ve still got quite a long way to go in both.
    5. Respect currently have 1 MP following a by-election in 2012. Whilst they are not certain to retain the seat, they should probably be included to at least give them the chance in the game.
    6. UKIP’s spending limit should be higher, having already received a number of large donations including one of £1million in December.
    7. UKIP will never win Orkney and Shetland. Ever.
    8. I assume you are going to add more potential party leaders. My suggestions would be:
    Con: George Osborne, Boris Johnson, Teresa May, Michael Gove, Philip Hammond, Sajid Javid.
    Lab: Ed Balls, Yvette Cooper, Andy Burnham, Alan Johnson, Chuka Umunna.
    Lib Dem: Vince Cable, Danny Alexander, Tim Farron, Ed Davey.
    UKIP: Paul Nuttall, Douglas Carswell, Suzanne Evans.
    Green: Caroline Lucas.

    For a decent idea of who is likely to win what seat, take a look at this website and play around with the figures: http://may2015.com/category/seat-calculator/

  6. Michael January 31, 2015 at 7:24 am #

    Also, the policy positions need a lot of work. What is considered left wing in the USA is often quite a centrist policy here in Britain. UKIP, for example, is certainly not a centre-left party.

    For example, on immigration, the policies should be something like this:

    Far left: complete open borders, allowing in any migrants and asylum seekers. All illegal immigrants allowed to stay.
    Left: minimal restrictions on migrants and no restrictions on asylum seekers. Illegal immigrants allowed to stay.
    Centre-left: no restrictions on migrants coming to work, few restrictions on other migrants. Illegal immigrants allowed to stay after a certain period of time.
    Centre: no restrictions on migrants coming to work, some restrictions on other migrants. Illegal immigrants allowed to stay after a certain period of time.
    Centre-right: some restrictions on migrants coming to work, restrictions on other migrants, limited number of asylum seekers. Illegal immigrants encouraged to return home.
    Right: only skilled migrants allowed to come to work, heavy restrictions on other migrants, limited number of asylum seekers. Illegal immigrants deported.
    Far right: complete ban on all immigrants into the country. Existing immigrants encouraged to return home. No asylum seekers. Illegal immigrants deported.

    The issues also need to change. For example, the NHS, the economy and immigration are high, whereas energy or defence aren’t particularly important. Iran is definitely not an issue at all.

  7. Required January 31, 2015 at 7:26 am #

    The new interface looks great and the new game looks particularly fun.

    In terms of leader attributes I think some of them are vastly wrong in places, and as a neutral I suggest a few things:
    -Ed Miliband is the most unpopular major leader since Michael Foot and nearly of all time (since modern polling began), constantly in the news for being awkward, his charisma should be 2. He is however seen as more trustworthy in polls by the British public so maybe his integrity should be higher than Cameron’s
    -Nigel Farage should have higher debating and higher Experience. He’s never been in Parliament as an MP before, but he has been a member of the EU Parliament for a substantial amount of time and run the party from a fringe party to a viable third/fourth option. His debating should also be at least a 4 (arguably a 5). Like him or not, he absolutely trashed Nick Clegg in the Europe debates and continues to score highly in gov/ media polls about his debating skills and how he appears as a leader.
    -Nick Clegg should have lower debating, this would appear right for last election, but recent displays in the HoC and in debates such as that with Farage over Europe have seen him struggle to hold his ground.
    -In addition to this his integrity should be around a 2, maybe a 3. Nick Clegg has dropped significantly in national polls especially after flip-flopping on major issues like Tuition fees etc.

    Other than that the major parties seem fine.

    You could make a small argument for Respect needing to be added, but the way it looks at the moment, the parties are great along with their starting funds.

    And finally the percentages. They are great and have done a great job but the start should probably be a few percent higher nationally (hovering around 30%).

    Some key issues that need to be included and possibly have options on have already been discussed by other commenters such as the NHS etc.

    Just a few tid bits and I appreciate you said remnants of the American game would still be involved, but just in case you missed it, things such as creating a crusader (or known as a surrogate in America?) still has American senators. You probably know this but just thought I’d check.

    Also can I ask if individual names of those in constituencies will be added like in the last one? I have lost my activation code and old email but I’m sure what I remember from the last one it went into great detail with that. Of course I appreciate this is a very early stage but that was just purely out of interest.

    Other than that, it looks incredible and seems to be an amazing start to the game! Great job.

    (p.s. I can provide sources to polls etc if needed to help make it clearer. E.g. https://yougov.co.uk/news/2014/11/02/ed-milibands-approval-rating-sinks-all-time-low/ )

  8. Niklas Rhodin January 31, 2015 at 7:44 am #

    Looks set to be a great game when it’s finished. I can see there’s lots of work to be done with the issues, particularly. And as many others have already pointet out, the polls should be fixed. And there’s lots of work to be done with the debates, surrogates and endorsements.

    One thing that catched my eyes were the misspelling of Ed Miliband’s surname, ingame it says “Milliband”, with two “L:s”, when it’s infact spelled with one “L”. Althoug that can be fixed easily.

    Some issues I think should be included is:

    – NHS (this will probably be the key issue for this election)
    – Cost of living crisis (one of Labour’s key isses, wages and minim wage etch)
    – Deficit reducton (both of the man parties are talking alot about it)
    – Economic management (Tories are talking about long-term economic plans and so on)
    – Energy prices (Miliband’s pledge for energy bills freeze)
    – Housing (both of the main parties are talking about it)
    – Europan Union (Cameron’s pledge to hold a referendum, UKIP’s rise and so on)
    – Immigration (tighter border security, could be one of the key issues this election)

    Issues that should NOT be included in the game is:

    – Same-sex marriage (not that big of an issue anymore, not in the same way it is in the US anyway, it is already legalised in the UK)
    – Iran (not an isse at all in British politcs as far as I’m concerned)
    – Abortion
    – Free trade

  9. Steven Van Caenegem January 31, 2015 at 8:30 am #

    The most important themes according to me (I’m an amateur but I try to be up to speed on these things) are the ones that will be pushed by the parties:
    Conservatives: OLTEP (our long term economic plan) wil be pushed relentlessly => tax & spend and economy/jobs/…
    Labour: Have already unveiled their theme: NHS and Cost of Living (economy?)
    SNP: Constitutional Reform!! (this would uniquely require different themes for Scotland)
    LibDems: We’re the moderating factor in the coalition and ‘look at all we’ve done!’ (Experience issue?)
    UKIP: Banging on about EU, Immigration, Same-sexmarriage.
    Greens: environment, maybe Trident?

    I don’t know wheter it’s doable but Scotland will probably have different issue focus than England. Constitutional reform, Trident, Oil revenues fund,…

    I’ve also read that Lord Ashcroft has put a wealth of polling data online http://www.lordashcroftpolls.com you probably already knew but I though I should mention it.

    good luck with your game! I’m sure it will be splendid

  10. Dominic January 31, 2015 at 9:03 am #

    I much prefer the layout which was used for the 2010 Election Game not the Current American style layout. The polling needs to be higher for Labour and the Conservatives. It just needs to be a lot more simpler I do like the ability to choose seats to campaign in but the whole layout is just too complicated.

  11. Alasdair January 31, 2015 at 9:36 am #

    SNP are undervalued- they should be around 45%+ as a starting position and their target should be 50 seats.

    The Greens have candidates in most of Wales, at the moment quite a few Welsh constituencies are lacking Greens (Alyn and Deeside, Delyn etc.) I suspect this is why the Green percentages in the constituencies they are standing in are so OP- they don’t have enough to distribute that support between.

    Parties included seem right, there’s none I see the lack of or would exclude. The BNP, Britain First, National Front etc. won’t (Thank God) be a talking point in this election. In Scotland the SSP may have enough of an effect in some constituencies (Dundee West?) to swing the result away from the SNP (or perhaps towards them). It may also be a good idea to include the Scottish Greens as a separate entity (they are irl)- this enables Greens to appeal to independence-minded voters there without generating a backlash down South. It would also add new challenges to the game, although there would then be grounds for a Green Part of Northern Ireland- again, perhaps not a bad thing seeing as they are separate again, but may affect playability (slow down etc.). I back separating them anyway, but it’s not a huge issue.

    In light of recent events I suggest giving the Greens around £2.5m- they’ve had a membership surge and some significant donations from individuals. This figure is also more realistic for the SNP as well.

    Lib Dems will do reasonably well in some places, and Ukip won’t break through at all in Scotland (lost deposits quite likely). The starting position of Ukip taking Orkney and Shetland off the Liberals is hugely unlikely- Hell will freeze over before Orkney and Shetland elects anyone other than a Lib Dem!

    Labour are more right-of-centre on immigration than their platform suggests at the moment- see David Lammy MP’s comments on their recent election material.

    On the issue of platforms more generally, it seems they’re calibrated to US public opinion and are therefore too right wing.

    Ukip seem to support renewable energy and government subsidy, immigration, taxes, gun control, environmental legislation… I assume this hasn’t been looked at yet, but if it has there’s still a lot to be done.

    All in all, it looks quite good though!

  12. ben January 31, 2015 at 10:13 am #

    It would be nice to see the ending of the game make the actual playing of the game more worthwhile rather than a message saying you didnt form the next government for example.
    Maybe you could include coalition negotiations, if that’s even possible that is.

  13. Connor January 31, 2015 at 10:50 am #

    I’ll reply as fully as I can on each subject, if you wish I can provide more in detail information but I think this would be best done via email. Be back in a little bit with my comments.

  14. Connor January 31, 2015 at 11:27 am #

    LEADER ATTRIBUTES – DAVID CAMERON

    Leadership – 4
    (one of the most decisive party leaders when looking at polls)
    Charisma – 3
    (charismatic but not super charismatic, see PM’s questions)
    Integrity – 3
    (I would say that he cannot be higher than this due to the public view on his promises)
    Stamina – 4
    (lots of his strategies include him/other conservatives running around visiting places)
    Experience – 4
    (by virtue of his position)
    Debating – 3
    (he’s okay but rarely wins debates or convinces people outright, also angry)
    Issue Familiarity – 4
    (Quick off the mark on most issues, unlikely to be caught off guard)

    Command – 4
    (main party and quite disciplined)
    Fund Raising – 4
    (big on donors, always been quite good at finding incomes)
    Strategic – 4
    (organised main party)
    Research – 4
    (organised main party)
    Ads – 3
    (early ads have been okay but not super effective)
    Polling – 3
    (conservatives do not have the most accurate polling at all, see rochester)
    Spin – 4
    (quite effective at this, especially with Linton Crosby)
    Ground – 3
    (conservatives aren’t doing amazing on this regard atm, lost a lot to UKIP)
    Corruption – 3
    (have many allegations left at their door)

    STARTING FUNDS – £10,000,000
    (this is taken from looking at accounts, the massive drop in membership and the ever reducing amount the main parties are able to spend at general elections)

  15. Connor January 31, 2015 at 11:38 am #

    LEADER ATTRIBUTES – ED MILLIBAND

    Leadership – 2
    (really, really bad, not viewed as capable even by his own party)
    Charisma – 2
    (again, big flop, rarely inspires people and struggles because of it)
    Integrity – 4
    (rarely involved in anything scandalous, rarely considered to be lying)
    Stamina – 4
    (another leader who’s strategy is to get out amongst the voters)
    Experience – 3
    (ministerial and has been in gov a long time)
    Debating – 3
    (better at debates than most give him credit for, often equals cam)
    Issue Familiarity – 4
    (good with issues and well informed)

    Command – 4
    (main party and disciplined)
    Fund Raising – 4
    (has been able to draw sizeable funds to the party)
    Strategic – 4
    (organised main party)
    Research – 4
    (organised main party)
    Ads – 3
    (ill-made adverts in the past, none that truly succeed)
    Polling – 3
    (made errors in their predictions for heywood and middleton, almost lost)
    Spin – 3
    (somewhat effective but not so much as the cons)
    Ground – 4
    (labour activists are plentiful, even after losing some to the greens, they’ve gained some from the lib dems)
    Corruption – 3
    (lots of allegations thrown at labour over the parliament)

    STARTING FUNDS – £14,000,000
    (have received massive donations from unions and from new members and will easily outspend the tories this election)

  16. Connor January 31, 2015 at 11:50 am #

    LEADER ATTRIBUTES – NIGEL FARAGE

    Leadership – 4
    (an expert in this regard, the rise of UKIP shows that)
    Charisma – 4
    (talented public speaker, very persuasive)
    Integrity – 3
    (you might even consider lowering this to a 2, dirt seems quite available for attackers)
    Stamina – 4
    (this man is everywhere, incredibly active and energetic campaigner)
    Experience – 2
    (would say that he hasn’t had the time on the public stage long enough to be any higher)
    Debating – 4
    (absolutely crushed nick clegg and has proven to be able to turn debates or conversations to his advantage)
    Issue Familiarity – 4
    (part of the entire reason he has got UKIP this far is due to his knowledge of what issues to tap into)

    Command – 3
    (organised but still not quite disciplined)
    Fund Raising – 2
    (still not pulling in the needed funds)
    Strategic – 3
    (organised but still not there yet)
    Research – 3
    (quite able when it comes to tapping into voters feelings)
    Ads – 3
    (ads have been quite successful in the past, although they are Marmite ads)
    Polling – 3
    (now have access to polling similar to the other parties and used this to their advantage)
    Spin – 3
    (getting better at this everyday, proven with the recent defection)
    Ground – 4
    (UKIP’s biggest advantage is their army of grassroots campaigners)
    Corruption – 2
    (could be lowered to 1, UKIP are scandalous)

    STARTING FUNDS – £3-5,000,000
    (their funding is hard to guess at but to my understanding they should be able to reach 3 mill but could reach 5, depends how you think it will pan out)

  17. Connor January 31, 2015 at 11:59 am #

    LEADER ATTRIBUTES – NICK CLEGG

    Leadership – 3
    (still maintains a good level head and somewhat good control over his party)
    Charisma – 3
    (lost his shine after the last general election but still proves persuasive)
    Integrity – 3
    (lost a lot of his integrity after the last election, considered a breaker of promises by most)
    Stamina – 3
    (not as active as the other leaders)
    Experience – 4
    (he knows his stuff, and has been running the country for 5 years)
    Debating – 3
    (proven to have fallen behind during his debate with Nigel Farage)
    Issue Familiarity – 4
    (always quick off the mark, better than most other leaders)

    Command – 4
    (lib dems are one of the most organised parties, don’t diss them on this)
    Fund Raising – 3
    (still bring in cash)
    Strategic – 4
    (still organised on this)
    Research – 4
    (still organised on this)
    Ads – 2
    (lib dems adverts have proven to be unpersuasive recently)
    Polling – 3
    (on the same level as the other parties)
    Spin – 3
    (okay but haven’t been amazing on this account)
    Ground – 4
    (Lib dem footsoldiers are one of their strengths, they’ll hold many seats this way)
    Corruption – 3
    (pretty sound, could be upgraded to a 4 they rarely get accused of things)

    STARTING FUNDS – £3-5,000,000
    (this could go up or down but considering their poor performances I think it’s likely to be in the lower range)

  18. Connor January 31, 2015 at 12:08 pm #

    LEADER ATTRIBUTES – Natalie Bennett

    Leadership – 3
    (took over the party in a well and controlled manner)
    Charisma – 2
    (seriously lacks persuasive power, see daily politics interview)
    Integrity – 3
    (no scandals yet, but she’s not seen as a bastion of truth)
    Stamina – 3
    (not shown to be as active as the other leaders)
    Experience – 2
    (been a party leader the shortest amount of time, gaffes galore on daily politics)
    Debating – 2
    (again, she has a serious issue with public appearances even in interviews)
    Issue Familiarity – 3
    (she knows her stuff but hasn’t proven to be anything special)

    Command – 2
    (haven’t quite got their organisation professionalised)
    Fund Raising – 2
    (money is going to be a serious issue in the election ahead)
    Strategic – 2
    (not aware of any targeting strategy, other parties are already quite clear)
    Research – 2
    (not organised enough to merit a 3)
    Ads – 2
    (not pulled anything amazing off the printer yet)
    Polling – 2
    (again, not organised enough)
    Spin – 3
    (okay spinners, see debate debates)
    Ground – 4
    (the green’s only advantage, they have a ton of highly dedicated activists)
    Corruption – 2
    (not corrupt but many members say stupid things)

    STARTING FUNDS – £1,000,000
    (seems right, seems what the level should be at when you look at their accounts)

  19. Will January 31, 2015 at 12:14 pm #

    I think it would be a mistake to put Labour’s funds as higher than the Tories, given the the Tories received more donations in the first three quarters of last year. I can’t find the figures for the fourth quarter, but I think the funds as they stand now are fine.

  20. Michael January 31, 2015 at 12:50 pm #

    I’ve found a problem:

    When you click on the swing icon to look at which seats a party is going to win, the Conservatives are only lister as winning Aberconwy. The rest of the list is missing.

  21. Connor January 31, 2015 at 1:00 pm #

    @Will: Even so, Labour have a massive amount of excess assets and have kept spending low in anticipation of the election. Their spending power is certainly equal to the conservatives if not higher. I wouldn’t give the conservatives any serious financial advantage on this.

  22. Spring January 31, 2015 at 1:04 pm #

    Some attribute suggestions for possible alternative leaders.

    Conservatives:

    George Osborne – Le – 3, In – 3, Ex – 3, IF – 4 (very knowledgable, knows what he’s talking about), Ch – 2 (kind of Nixon-esque, just lacks charm and turns people off), St – 4 (gets around a lot from what I can tell), De – 4 (not good on style, but excellent on substance in both in the House of Commons and in the TV debate he had with Darling and Cable in 2010)

    Boris Johnson – Le – 4, In – 3, Ex – 3 (being Mayor of London isn’t quite enough to raise it above a 3 imo), IF – 3, Ch – 5 (probably the strongest English politician on this; has followers on both sides of the spectrum due to his colourfulness), St – 5 (likes to do daring activities such as dangling from a wire quite often), De – 2 (stumbling and generally not good in interviews and was poor in the Mayoral debates iirc)

    Labour:

    Ed Balls – Le – 3, In – 3, Ex – 3, IF – 4, Ch – 3, St – 2 (not in the greatest psychical shape), De – 4 (not a great speaker but is very combative and tends to get his points across well)

    Andy Burnham – Le – 3, In – 4 (clean by senior political standards as far as I know), Ex – 3, IF – 3, Ch – 4 (folksy and likeable in media appearances; reminds me of Mike Huckabee to an extent), De – 4 (again, strong at the dispatch box)

    Chuka Umunna – Le – 3, In – 4, Ex – 2 (only elected in 2010), IF – 3, Ch – 4 (very smooth, though recently walked out of an interview), St – 4, De – 3

  23. Connor January 31, 2015 at 1:22 pm #

    @Steven Van Caenegem: I know we’re not talking about themes yet but I feel I must comment –

    Conservatives: Economic Management (they love this), Tax and Spend (middle class tax cuts), Leadership (want to highlight ed’s incapability)
    Labour: NHS (their best issue), Minimum Wage (living wage campaign), Government (want a labour gov)
    LibDems: Government (want a coalition again), i don’t know what else, they’ve not defined their campaign well yet
    UKIP: Immigration (of course), EU (of course), Government (they advertise that they’ll be able to ensure a government acts in the people’s interest through demand and supply)
    Greens: Environment (of course), Minimum Wage (they want to shoot the wage through the roof), need to look more

    BACK TO PERCENTAGES:

    Also I wouldn’t trust ashcroft’s polling, his polling is known to be irratic at best although it might be useful at hinting parties current positions in certain constituencies but remember your pinch of salt. I would instead go with wikipedia’s averaged polling or uk polling reports averaged polling for a more accurate national and regional hint.

    I’d love to advise on an individual level as by utilising uk polling report’s wealth of knowledge across all 650 constituencies you can get a very good idea of where the party’s are across the nation.

    Also I would say that the liberals are an interesting party, anywhere where they are first or second parties they are still quite strong but everywhere else they’ve lost almost all their support.

  24. Will January 31, 2015 at 1:28 pm #

    Another minor problem is that the Conservatives seem to be set as the incumbent party for every seat.

  25. anthony_270admin January 31, 2015 at 1:43 pm #

    Thank you everyone for the feedback – I am going through it and much of this will be incorporated for the next release.

    Again, a big thank you!

  26. anthony_270admin January 31, 2015 at 1:44 pm #

    @Required,

    Yes, individual names of candidates will be added.

  27. Michael January 31, 2015 at 4:53 pm #

    One thing that I don’t like is election night.

    I don’t mind the results changing as you go through counting the votes, although I did prefer the old system of each region announcing their results in turn.

    I do not like the fact that you have to click through all the seats in each region to see which ones you won. A single list of all the results of all the seats in that region would be much more user-friendly.

  28. EPG February 1, 2015 at 7:21 am #

    This is good so far.

    Titles for politicians work differently in the UK compared to the Canadian or US systems; in particular, the office comes after the name, and “The Hon.” isn’t used.

    In this game’s engine, where titles come before the names, correct titles and names are:
    Rt. Hon. David Cameron; Ed Miliband; Nick Clegg; Nicola Sturgeon; Peter Robinson.
    Mr. Nigel Farage; Gerry Adams; Mike Nesbitt; David Ford.
    Ms. Natalie Bennett.
    Dr. Alasdair McDonnell.

    For an idea of relative spending figures, the FT article from 16 January, “Conservatives set to outgun Labour on general election spending”, suggests Cons will spend up to £19.5m, Lab £12m. Everyone else is fine: LDs historically spent around £4-5m. Ukip should have as much as LDs.

  29. EPG February 1, 2015 at 7:43 am #

    One more title I didn’t mention is Ms. Leanne Wood.
    The important parties are all in the game. Respect should be treated like independents; they’ll be really small.
    “Senate Majority-To-Be” should instead refer to being Prime Minister, but for most parties, which are small, this line doesn’t make as much sense as in the two-party fight for the Senate majority.
    The nickname/motto/date when you hover over the flags should all be changed, depending on whether they are UK, England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland. Perhaps these should just be removed for the UK; they aren’t as prominent as in the USA.
    “Surrogates” would be called “Campaigners” in the UK.
    Percentages should be much higher for the SNP and lower for Labour throughout Scotland. The Lib Dem percentages should be more skewed; they should lose lots of votes in seats they didn’t win in 2010, and lose fewer in seats they won against the Conservatives.
    Ukip are incumbents in Clacton (Home Counties North) and they should be very strongly favoured to win that seat. They are also incumbents in Rochester and Strood (Home Counties South).
    As other people have written, there are websites like may2015 that give very rough forecasts of local results. That would be the biggest improvement that could be made to percentages right now.

  30. JL_9252 February 1, 2015 at 10:16 am #

    For the endorsement..
    The Guardian
    The Times
    The Independent
    Daily Telegraph
    Daily Mail
    The Sun
    Financial Times

    I miss out some.. Of course some regional areas will have their own endorsement…
    Unions also..

  31. Connor February 1, 2015 at 1:12 pm #

    @JL_9252 For newspapers I would say:
    The Sun
    (largest readership so simply gives momentum on leadership perhaps, leans no-way)
    Daily Mail
    (2nd largest, another basic momentum endorser, leans tory)
    Daily Mirror
    (3rd largest, another basic momentum endorser, leans labour)

    Evening Standard
    (big london paper, be good for momentum on financial issues as well there, dunno where it leans)
    Daily Record
    (major scottish paper, i think they lean lab and snp)

    Daily Telegraph
    (smaller national paper, leans tory)
    Daily Express
    (smaller national paper, leans UKIP I do believe)
    Daily Star
    (smaller national paper, dunno where they lean)
    The Times
    (smaller national paper, leans tory)
    The Independent
    (smaller national paper, leans towards no-one)
    Financial Times
    (smaller national paper, gives economy related bonuses to momentum, leans tory)
    The Guardian
    (smaller national paper, leans labour)

    There are other regional papers and such but the above listed are the most powerful papers in the nation.

    Also I think it should be possible that some endorsements aren’t gained. As in the 2010 election the Daily Star and the Independent did not support any party.

  32. Connor February 1, 2015 at 1:12 pm #

    Also I’ll comment on percentages tomorrow.

  33. Aaron Booth February 1, 2015 at 5:29 pm #

    Hopefully the Ads/financial will get fixed. To run an ad nation wide, it costs over 52 million pounds per turn. Also, the total vote count when I just played was over 1.3 billion voters. This might be at least part of the issue with the cost of running ads.

  34. Connor February 2, 2015 at 8:02 am #

    Just a few minor issue ideas, concerning some issues:

    Economic Management (5)

    NHS (4)

    Immigration (4)
    – Progressively reduce immigration controls and increase legal rights for asylum speakers (left)
    – Aim to reduce low-skill immigration while ensuring that high skill migrants and university students are not deterred (center)
    – Make immigrants wait before they can claim benefits and aim to reduce immigration to below 100,000 (center-right)
    – Introduce a system of controlled immigration, focusing on attracting skilled migrants and deport illegal immigrants (right)

    Pensions (3)
    Education (3)
    Housing (3)
    Benefits (3)
    Devolution (3)
    Energy (3)

    Crime (2)
    Taxation (2)
    Family life (2)
    Environment (2)

    European Union (2)
    – Legislate for a referendum on membership in the next parliament, campaigning for a vote to stay in (left)
    – No need for a referendum, current law makes necessary provisions, support membership (center-left)
    – Legislate for a referendum on membership to take place in the middle of the next parliament, negotiate for reform (center-right)
    – Legislate for an immediate referendum on membership, campaigning for a vote to leave (right)
    – Immediately legislate to leave the European Union (far-right)

    Foreign Policy (2)
    Military (2)
    Terrorism (2)

    Transport (1)

Leave a Reply

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes